Warning: include(): http:// wrapper is disabled in the server configuration by allow_url_include=0 in /home/twoway/public_html/food/wineday/annex/0798quiz.html on line 9

Warning: include(http://globalgourmet.com/includes/banner468.html): failed to open stream: no suitable wrapper could be found in /home/twoway/public_html/food/wineday/annex/0798quiz.html on line 9

Warning: include(): Failed opening 'http://globalgourmet.com/includes/banner468.html' for inclusion (include_path='.:/usr/lib/php:/usr/local/lib/php') in /home/twoway/public_html/food/wineday/annex/0798quiz.html on line 9

 

Wine—101

"LABEL LINGO...A QUIZ "

(4 right = C, 6 = B+, 8 is EXCEPTIONAL)

 

by Fred McMillin


1. Question—The Trefethen Chardonnay label indicates the vintage is 1995. Could 5% of the wine in the bottle legally be from another year?

  • Answer—Yes.

2. Question—The Tessera Merlot label indicates the grapes came from "CALIFORNIA." Legally, may 5% of the wine be made of grapes from Oregon?

  • Answer—No. If the label says "California," 100% of the grapes must have been grown in that state.

3. Question—The label on the Pedroncelli Cabernet Sauvignon states the grapes came from the "Morris Fay Vineyard." Legally, may 5% of the grapes be from a different vineyard?

  • Answer—Yes.

4. Question—The Buena Vista Winery's Pinot Noir label indicates the grapes came from California's Carneros district. May the wine legally contain up to 25% of a different varietal such as Syrah?

  • Answer—Yes. California uses the federal limit, which permits 25% of other varietals. (However, Buena Vista uses 100% Pinot.)

5. Question—King Estate Winery's Pinot Noir label indicates the grapes were grown in Oregon. May this Oregon winery's Pinot legally contain up to 25% of a different varietal such as Syrah?

  • Answer—No. The state of Oregon imposes a more strict standard than do the Feds; only 10% of a different varietal may be included.

6. Question—Sonoma Valley is shown as the grape source for Kenwood's Reserve Chardonnay. Legally, may 15% of the wine come from another area, such as the Napa Valley?

  • Answer—Yes. Again, California adheres to the federal limit, which in this case permits 15% from outside the named viticultural area.

7. Question—Oregon's Willamette Valley is shown as the source for the Eyrie Vineyards's Chardonnay. Legally, may 15% of the wine come from another district?

  • Answer—No. Oregon imposes a stricter limit than the Feds. The Eyrie Chardonnay must be 100% from the area named on the label.

8. Does federal law require that the vintage year of the wine be shown on the label?

  • Answer—No.

9. Regarding table wines (up to 14% alcohol), does federal law require that the alcohol content be shown on the label?

  • Answer—No. The label may simply state "Table Wine."

10. Will the Feds approve light-hearted labels?

  • Answer—Yes. Jory named its Gold Medal blend of red wine grapes, the PURPLE GANG.
  •  

Presented by The eGG.
Copyright © 1998, The electronic Gourmet Guide, Inc.
All Rights reserved.

foodwine.com | WineDay | Annex