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Foodday

 

About Halibut

Halibut  

The premium whitefish adapts well to baking, broiling, frying, poaching or barbecuing and is compatible with any number of flavor accents and sauces. Halibut is an excellent source of high-quality protein and minerals. It is low in sodium, fat and calories and contains a minimum of bones.

Easy to Handle and Prepare

Purchase. When purchasing halibut steaks or roasts, allow about 5 ounces for each serving.

Storage. Properly packaged halibut may be stored in the home freezer at 0 degrees F or lower for up to 6 months. For optimum quality, freshly thawed halibut may be stored in the refrigerator for 1-3 days.

Thaw. Defrost in the refrigerator 8-10 hours or overnight in a covered container. Halibut may also be thawed in a microwave oven according to manufacturers directions.

Easy to Prepare

Seafood is easy to cook. Allow 10 minutes of cooking time per inch of thickness, measuring fish as its thickest part, or until halibut flakes when tested with a fork. This rule applies to any of the easy cooking techniques listed below.

Bake. Place halibut in baking dish in a preheated oven at 450 degrees F. It is not necessary to turn halibut during cooking. Brush with butter or sprinkle with herbs if desired.

Grill. Place halibut on well-greased grill a few inches above hot coals. Turn once halfway through cooking time. Brush halibut with oil, butter, margarine several times during cooking.

sauté. sauté halibut in oil, butter or margarine over medium-high heat. Turn halibut for even browning halfway through cooking.

Poach. Cover halibut with boiling, salted water. You can add flavorings such as lemon slices, white wines or herbs to the poaching liquid.

Broil. Broil halibut 4 inches from heat. Brush halibut with oil, butter, margarine or marinade several times during cooking.

 

Halibut Chowder

Chowder
  • 2 lbs. halibut, thawed if necessary
  • 1/2 cup each finely chopped onions, green pepper, celery and carrots
  • 6 Tbsp. butter or margarine, divided
  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 3/4 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. white pepper
  • 2 cups milk
  • 3 Tbsp. flour
  • 2-1/2 cups shredded sharp Cheddar cheese
  • 1 Tbsp. minced parsley

Remove skin and bones from halibut; cut into bite-sized pieces. sauté vegetables in 3 tablespoons butter. Add halibut, chicken broth, salt and pepper. Simmer, covered, 5 minutes. Add milk and heat gently. Combine remaining 3 tablespoons butter with flour and add to chowder. Cook and stir until slightly thickened. Add cheese; Cook and stir over low heat until cheese melts. Sprinkle with parsley.

Makes 6 to 8 servings.

 

Halibut Sauté

  • 1 lb. halibut, thawed if necessary
  • Salt and pepper
  • 3 Tbsp. oil, divided
  • 1 cup each thinly sliced carrots, sliced celery, diagonally sliced green onions and broccoli florets
  • 1/4 tsp. grated ginger root*
  • 1/4 cup chicken broth or water
  • 2 tsp. cornstarch
  • 1 tsp. grated lemon or lime peel

Remove skin and bones from halibut; cut into 1-inch cubes. Season halibut with salt and pepper. Sauté in 2 tablespoons oil until barely cooked; remove halibut from skillet. Sauté vegetables in remaining oil until crisp-tender. Return halibut to skillet. Add 1/4 teaspoon salt and ginger. Combine chicken broth, cornstarch and lemon peel; add to fish mixture. Cook and stir until thickened and halibut flakes when tested with a fork.

Makes 4 servings.

* 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger may be substituted.

 

Provided by Alaska Seafood

This page originally published as a FoodDay article in 1997.

Copyright © 2007, Forkmedia LLC. All rights reserved.

 
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This page modified January 2007


 

 
 

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